A day in Australia

61 meters of Gloucester

Next time anyone tells me that Australia is nothing but a desert, I'll suggest them to go and climb one of the karri trees. For example, the Gloucester tree, standing at 61 meters in height.

 

Climbing Gloucester tree near Pemberton, Australia: Shadows and highlights adjusted

Climbing Gloucester tree near Pemberton, Australia  READ MORE »

Waves that break

There's time to enjoy.

Riding the top of the wave, between Yallingup and Hamelin bay, Australia: Some sharpening added to the image

Riding the top of the wave, between Yallingup and Hamelin bay, Australia

 

 

But there's also  READ MORE »

The power of community

The fire destroyed big part of Busselton jetty in 1999. Rebuilding costs were estimated at around 1 million dollars, and neither municipality nor state government wanted to finance the process.

The community then took initiative, established a committee and managed a successful fund raising campaign, what resulted in reopening of the jetty for public visitors.

 

Wooden jetty in Busselton, Australia

Wooden jetty in Busselton, Australia

 

Active community, working together, can produce  READ MORE »

Internet from the dinosaur era

A few words about telecommunications in Australia.

 

There still are plenty of payphones, and it does not seem like they are going out of fashion anytime soon. Most of them are even upgraded with a "send SMS" function. Bastards eat coins like crazy.

 

Mobile connection is very unreliable, except from cities. Understandable, bearing in mind the huge territory of the country. Expensive.

 

Internet. Poor Australians.

Timeworn computers in Grand central backpackers hostel, Perth, Australia

Timeworn computers in Grand central backpackers hostel, Perth, Australia

 

Costs around 3 to 5 dollars in internet cafes of the bigger cities. The facilities sometimes are imported from Ice Age. See above.

If you are unlucky  READ MORE »

Inventions from the future

Meet Transperth, a public transport company of Perth city.

 

Transperth logotype on a bus stop, Perth, Australia

Transperth logotype on a bus stop, Perth, Australia

 

They are famous for  READ MORE »

Run away, the job is chasing!

Mining industry is booming in Western Australia. Scattered around the vast territory, mines attract potential employees with 2000-AUD-a-week pay cheques.

Higher pay and lower living costs work like a charm. Men, leaving behind their current jobs, flock there like bees to honey. Women follow, filling in the need of waitresses in country pubs.

That creates a grand shortage of employees in cities. Can't find a street corner without five "staff wanted" ads.

Today I'm standing on such a corner. It is 5.01 P.M. in Perth, capital of the region.
A horde of office workers are running away from their working places towards a train, that'll take them home, and then surfing for a few hours.

Hordes of employees escaping their office jobs, Perth, Western Australia

Hordes of employees escaping their office jobs, Perth, Western Australia

In each and every ones eyes, I see a message. "We don't  READ MORE »

Extreme mobility

Having a house, two cars for a family, and a boat, in Australia means living a good life.
Some probably decide to add-on the "Villa on Wheels".

 

Mega super duper king sized caravan, Western Australia

Mega super duper king sized caravan, Western Australia

At the same time we have covered nearly 4000 kilometers from Darwin to  READ MORE »

Last snow — the Ice Age

Humorous sign in Wickham, Australia

Humorous sign in Wickham, Australia

It's said that Australians possess a sense of humour, often irony and autoirony. And that they use it often in daily life.  READ MORE »

Animal roadside kamikazes

Emu running across the road in Western Australia

Emu running across the road in Western Australia

Road animals are a very real threat to Australian drivers. Much more so, than what we are used to in Europe. Numbers of wild kangaroos, wombats and emus are high, therefore  READ MORE »

Bush fires in Australia — natural and controlled

This earth, I never damage.
I look after. Fire is nothing, just clean up.
When you burn, new grass coming up.
That means good animal soon,
might be goanna, possum, wallaby.
Burn him off, new grass coming up, new life all over.

Bill Neidjie - Bunitj clan.
Aboriginal traditional owner.

The first sight of fire burning on both sides of our road, even though far ahead, was quite uncomfortable.
Standing tall, dry grass and bushes were a good material for all-consuming flames.

Bush fires raging far ahead, Western Australia

Bush fires raging far ahead, Western Australia

We would have surely decided to stop or even  READ MORE »

Aboriginalities

Australian Northern territory and northern part of Western Australia are the places where most of aboriginal people live.
We haven't seen them before, and after the first occasion, a question immediately appeared in our heads that in its very simple form could sound:
"What the hell has happened?"

 

Group of aborigines sitting in the shade, Katherine, Australia

Group of aborigines sitting in the shade, Katherine, Australia

 

You see, at first glance the situation seems disastrous.  READ MORE »

Cowboys of the future

If you thought being a cowboy is old school, reconsider.

Now the guys are driving jeeps and flying helicopters.

Modern cow herding in Western Australia

Modern cow herding in Western Australia  READ MORE »

Boab tree — even the name sounds bulky

Australia is the oldest continent on earth, separated by sea from any other land a looong time ago. As a result, most of its flora and fauna is rather unusual, sometimes strange.

Take platypus or a kangaroo as an example.

Driving through Kimberley region of Western Australia, we had a chance to see one more of the lands mysteries - boab tree.

Boab tree in Kimberley region, Western Australia

Boab tree in Kimberley region, Western Australia

 

The tree makes his appearance in three places of the world - Africa, Madagascar and Australia.

And in  READ MORE »

Learning about the budget cuts

There's always a first impression arriving to a new place, influenced by some factors.
The place can be great, but the impression - sour. Or vice versa.

Australia, and namely Darwin, met us with three cards up its sleeve:
- Fantastic variety of wild birds on city's esplanade, allowing us to approach them in some cases as close as few meters.

Wild bird at the seaside in Darwin, Australia

Wild bird at the seaside in Darwin, Australia  READ MORE »

"Mudest" children

Children playing in muddy water in Yangon's streets, Myanmar

Children playing in muddy water in Yangon's streets, Myanmar

 

Continuing the examples of "things to learn in Asia", is children and their education. An average American or European mother would have a heart stroke spotting her children playing like that in a dirty water flooding the street. Bacteria, infections, ethics and whatnot are the monsters here.
Asian mothers tend to look at the issue relaxed. They grab their few months old children, put them on their backs and continue to do the daily business without any worries. As a result, children get daily exposure to the real world and grow up healthy and fit.  READ MORE »

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